Radiometric dating volcanic ash

Posted by / 26-Sep-2019 05:43

Radiometric dating volcanic ash

Argon gas, brought up from deep inside the earth within the molten rock, was already present in the lavas when they cooled.

We know the true ages of the rocks because they were observed to form less than 50 years ago.

He has told us when that was, in His eyewitness account in the Bible’s first book, Genesis, so we know how old all the rocks are.

How much better to place our confidence in the Creator who made and knows everything, and who never fails or tells lies, than in a radioactive dating method that has been repeatedly demonstrated to fail and to yield false ages for the earth’s rocks.

Blocks weighing up to 1,000 tonnes were hurled 100 m (330 feet).

However, the most violent explosions occurred on 19 February 1975, accompanied by what eye-witnesses described as atmospheric shock waves.9 Blocks up to 30 m (100 ft) across were catapulted up to 3 km (almost 2 miles). Turbulent avalanches of ash and blocks swept down Ngauruhoe’s sides at about 60 km (35 miles) per hour.10 It is estimated that at least 3.4 million cubic metres (120 million cubic feet) of ash and blocks were ejected in 7 hours.11up If any of these assumptions are violated, then the technique fails and any “dates” are false.

Yet they yield “ages” up to 3.5 million years which are thus false.

How can we trust the use of this same “dating” on rocks whose ages we don’t know?

This same failure is also known to occur in many other rocks, including both recent volcanics18and ancient crustal rocks.19 The radioactive potassium-argon dating method has been demonstrated to fail on 1949, 1954, and 1975 lava flows at Mt Ngauruhoe, New Zealand, in spite of the quality of the laboratory’s K–Ar analytical work.

The K–Ar method works on the assumption that the “clock” begins to “tick” the moment that the rock hardens.

That is, it assumes that no argon derived by radioactive decay was present initially, but after the lava cooled and solidified, the argon from radioactive decay was unable to escape and started to accumulate.

Because argon is a gas, it should escape to the atmosphere due to the intense heat of the lavas. All flows were typically made up of jumbled blocks of congealed lava, resulting in rough, jagged, clinkery surfaces (Figure 8).

Of course, no geologist was present to test this assumption by observing ancient lavas when they cooled, but we can study modern lava flows. The samples were sent progressively in batches to Geochron Laboratories in Cambridge, Boston (USA), for whole-rock potassium-argon (K–Ar) dating—first a piece of one sample from each flow, then a piece of the second sample from each flow after the first set of results was received, and finally, a piece of the third sample from the 30 June 1954 flow.15 To also test the consistency of results within samples, second pieces of two of the 30 June 1954 lava samples were also sent for analysis. No specific location or expected age information was supplied to the laboratory.

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The potassium-argon (K–Ar) dating method is often used to date volcanic rocks (and by extension, nearby fossils). Eleven samples were collected from five recent lava flows during field work in January 1996—two each from the 11 February 1949, 4 June 1954, and 14 July 1954 flows and from the 19 February 1975 avalanche deposits, and three from the 30 June 1954 flow14 (Figure 6).

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